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A History of American Law$
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Lawrence M. Friedman

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780190070885

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190070885.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 25 October 2021

The Bar and Its Works

The Bar and Its Works

Chapter:
(p.289) 8 The Bar and Its Works
Source:
A History of American Law
Author(s):

Lawrence M. Friedman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190070885.003.0009

This chapter discusses the bar, covering its organization, legal education, and the legal literature of the law. The bar was open to almost all men in a technical sense. But class and background did make a difference. Jacksonian ideology should not be taken at face value. The bar was, for one thing, somewhat stratified, even in the nineteenth century. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, there is a tremendous social distance between a Wall Street partner on the one hand, and on the other hand, lawyers who scrambled for a living at the bottom of the heap. Lawyers from wealthy or professional backgrounds were far more likely to reach the heights than lawyers from working-class homes. In 1800 and 1850, there were no large law firms, and hardly any firms at all.

Keywords:   Wall Street, bar, legal education, legal literature, lawyers

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