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Welfare for AutocratsHow Social Assistance in China Cares for its Rulers$
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Jennifer Pan

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780190087425

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190087425.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 January 2022

Distributing Social Assistance to Preempt Disorder

Distributing Social Assistance to Preempt Disorder

Chapter:
(p.74) 4 Distributing Social Assistance to Preempt Disorder
Source:
Welfare for Autocrats
Author(s):

Jennifer Pan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190087425.003.0004

This chapter discusses how Dibao is funded and shows the dual logic of Dibao distribution using a combination of qualitative fieldwork and a survey of 100 neighborhoods. The chapter focuses on the urban neighborhood, which plays a crucial role in the Dibao application process, as well as the surveillance and management of targeted populations, who are prioritized for Dibao. It provides background on the targeted population program, the functioning of neighborhood surveillance networks, and how heuristics are used to identify targeted populations. This chapter shows how Dibao administrators turn away many poor households who can participate in the labor market while at the same time actively helping able-bodied individuals get access to Dibao who are similarly poor but belong to targeted populations.

Keywords:   China, Dibao, urban neighborhood, block captain, grid network, grassroots surveillance, resident’s committee, targeted population, 重点人口, heuristics, crime, preemptive policing, unfunded mandate, survey

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