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Interrogation and TortureIntegrating Efficacy with Law and Morality$
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Steven J. Barela, Mark Fallon, Gloria Gaggioli, and Jens David Ohlin

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780190097523

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190097523.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 January 2022

Developing Rapport and Trust in the Interrogative Context

Developing Rapport and Trust in the Interrogative Context

An Empirically Supported Alternative

Chapter:
(p.141) 5 Developing Rapport and Trust in the Interrogative Context
Source:
Interrogation and Torture
Author(s):

Laure Brimbal

Steven M. Kleinman

Simon Oleszkiewicz

Christian A. Meissner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190097523.003.0006

Decades of behavioral science research has consistently demonstrated the advantages of employing a rapport-based approach to investigative and intelligence interviewing. After identifying the problematic procedures of accusatorial approaches, current research has turned to a more proactive study of the techniques and tactics that align with a rapport-based and information-gathering framework that is effective for eliciting comprehensive and reliable information. Despite a growing body of research supporting the use of this framework, it stands in contrast with an accusatorial approach that is common practice in North America (and other parts of the world). This chapter reviews empirically supported approaches for investigative interviewing (including aspects of effective elicitation and deception detection) and describes recent research on tactics for developing rapport and trust in the interrogative context. Herein we distinguish how trust and rapport-based techniques differ from currently employed confrontational techniques, and provide operational examples of how these tactics have been employed in the field.

Keywords:   investigative interviewing, rapport, trust, research, behavioral science

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