Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
American Exceptionalism in Crime and Punishment$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Kevin R. Reitz

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190203542

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190203542.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 24 October 2021

The Complications of Penal Federalism

The Complications of Penal Federalism

American Exceptionalism or 50 Different Countries?

Chapter:
(p.181) 4 The Complications of Penal Federalism
Source:
American Exceptionalism in Crime and Punishment
Author(s):

Franklin E. Zimring

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190203542.003.0005

This chapter discusses two punishments most often mentioned as examples of American national exceptionalism—capital punishment and imprisonment. It examines the available data on state penal power and patterns of these two most prominent issues implicated in discourse about American penal exceptionalism. The chapter shows that, in each setting, there are huge variations among American states. Moreover, in both cases, the study of interstate variation is a useful method of investigating the causes of penal difference. In the case of imprisonment trends over time, there may also be a nearly uniform pattern that reveals much about the influences of culture and public opinion on penal policy.

Keywords:   capital punishment, imprisonment, state penal power, American penal exceptionalism, interstate variation, penal difference, penal policy

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .