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Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention$
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Michael Thun, Martha S. Linet, James R. Cerhan, Christopher A. Haiman, and David Schottenfeld

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190238667

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190238667.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 September 2020

Endometrial Cancer

Endometrial Cancer

Chapter:
(p.909) 47 Endometrial Cancer
Source:
Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention
Author(s):

Linda S. Cook

Angela L. W. Meisner

Noel S. Weiss

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190238667.003.0047

Endometrial cancer is rare among women of reproductive age, but in older women can occur at an annual rate of up to 50 –100 per 100,000. The incidence varies more than five-fold across regions of the world, with the rates generally being highest in North America and Europe. Endometrial cancer can be classified into two broad histologic groups: the more common type I tumors (e.g., endometrioid adenocarcinoma), which have a relatively good prognosis (case-fatality in the neighborhood of 20%); and the less common type II tumors (e.g., serous carcinoma), which have a poorer prognosis. The endometrium is a hormone-responsive tissue, and there is a large body of evidence to support a hormonal basis for carciogenesis. Specifically, exposure to high levels of circulating estrogens increases endometrial cancer risk, especially for type I cancer, whereas exposure to progestogens reduces risk.

Keywords:   endometrial cancer, risk, hormones, estrogen, progestogen

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