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Human Performance OptimizationThe Science and Ethics of Enhancing Human Capabilities$
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Michael D. Matthews and David M. Schnyer

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780190455132

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190455132.001.0001

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Nutrition, Genetics, and Human Performance During Military Training

Nutrition, Genetics, and Human Performance During Military Training

Chapter:
(p.45) 3 Nutrition, Genetics, and Human Performance During Military Training
Source:
Human Performance Optimization
Author(s):

Erin Gaffney-Stomberg

James P. McClung

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190455132.003.0003

Military personnel train and conduct operations in environments that result in exposure to multiple stressors such as caloric deprivation, physical and psychological strain, and increased energy expenditure, which have profound effects on cognitive and physical performance. The objective of this chapter is to draw on the peer-reviewed literature, including laboratory studies, applied field studies, and controlled trials conducted in the military environment to detail the contribution of nutrition and genetics to human performance and protection from injury. In summary, relevant studies indicate that nutrition status and genetic factors hold promise as risk biomarkers and intervention targets for the development of tailored solutions to optimize human performance and prevent injury during occupationally demanding tasks.

Keywords:   caloric deprivation, human performance, injury, nutrition, single nucleotide polymorphism, SNP

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