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A Generous VisionThe Creative Life of Elaine de Kooning$
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Cathy Curtis

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190498474

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190498474.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 05 August 2021

Loft Life, Speaking Out, and European Vistas

Loft Life, Speaking Out, and European Vistas

Chapter:
(p.107) 7 Loft Life, Speaking Out, and European Vistas
Source:
A Generous Vision
Author(s):

Cathy Curtis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190498474.003.0007

During the 1960s, Elaine lived in a succession of New York lofts, where she painted, wrote, and entertained large groups of friends—including artists, writers, and athletes. She became caught up in the Death Row case of Caryl Chessman, one of several causes she vigorously pursued. Feminism was not among them. She was equally hostile to Pop Art, scorning it as simply “a way of making money.” The mid-sixties were a troubled time for Elaine: her mother died; Bill tried to divorce her. Her drinking escalated, leading to several car accidents and embarrassing scenes. (She stopped drinking in the mid-seventies.) Elaine spent summers in Paris as a teacher at the New York Studio School, bringing a family member or student along for city excursions. A Jules Dalou sculpture in the Jardin du Luxembourg prompted her Bacchus painting series, which captured the play of dappled light and foliage on the bronze figures.

Keywords:   New York, loft, Caryl Chessman, feminism, Pop Art, drinking, Paris, Jules Dalou, Bacchus, 1960s

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