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Beyond the CaseThe Logics and Practices of Comparative Ethnography$
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Corey M. Abramson and Neil Gong

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780190608484

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190608484.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

A Comparative Analysis of Comparative Ethnographies

Chapter:
(p.283) Conclusion
Source:
Beyond the Case
Author(s):

Neil Gong

Corey M. Abramson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190608484.003.0012

This volume is guided by the goal of productive pluralism—the simple notion that even though ethnographic approaches may be partially incompatible with one another, the field as a whole benefits from diverse contributions to understanding social life. Beyond a mutual tolerance that leaves ethnographers in their silos, such a pluralism supports sustained scholarly dialog to clarify points of disagreement as well as illuminate opportunities for collaborative problem-solving. To this end, this volume has included works from prominent scholars representing various traditions to articulate what, why, and how they engage in ethnographic comparison. This concluding chapter contextualizes the contributions of the authors, pointing to both divergences and (perhaps) surprising synergies in the ways they approach ethnography. The chapter begins by considering the basic questions of how and why the contributors perform comparison. Having summarized the approaches, the authors discuss specific comparisons of research processes, research products, and the criteria used for evaluating both. The chapter concludes by suggesting how these synergies open the possibility for a chance to address further concerns in comparative methodology.

Keywords:   methodology, comparison, ethnography, sociology, anthropology, pluralism, epistemology, ontology, qualitative research, sociology of science

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