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After the ProjectsPublic Housing Redevelopment and the Governance of the Poorest Americans$
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Lawrence J. Vale

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190624330

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190624330.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 22 October 2020

The Rise and Fall of North Beach Place

The Rise and Fall of North Beach Place

Chapter:
10 The Rise and Fall of North Beach Place
Source:
After the Projects
Author(s):

Lawrence J. Vale

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190624330.003.0013

Chapters 10, 11, and 12 describe a fourth form of HOPE VI poverty governance—one centered on the role of not-for-profit housing developers and community organizations in San Francisco. Chapter 10 charts the rise and fall of North Beach Place, demonstrating how the city’s Nonprofitus constellation burst forth from the cataclysm of urban renewal. Completed in 1952, the 229-unit development near Fisherman’s Wharf initially housed whites but gradually gained substantial African American and Chinese populations. With urban renewal, the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency (SFRA)—under the heavy-handed direction of Justin Herman from 1959 to 1971—displaced thousands of San Francisco’s blacks from the razed Fillmore District. Coupled with antihighway protests and other neighborhood backlash, San Francisco developed a broad constellation of neighborhood-based organizations determined to help low-income households remain. As a dysfunctional San Francisco Housing Authority (SFHA) staggered, North Beach Place declined, becoming a dangerous eyesore in a high-visibility tourist mecca.

Keywords:   San Francisco, North Beach Place, public housing, urban renewal, Fillmore, Justin Herman, redevelopment, antihighway protests, I-Hotel, governance

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