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The Death of Human Capital?Its Failed Promise and How to Renew It in an Age of Disruption$
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Phillip Brown, Hugh Lauder, and Sin Yi Cheung

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780190644307

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190644307.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 05 December 2021

Rethinking Labor Supply

Rethinking Labor Supply

Chapter:
(p.152) 10 Rethinking Labor Supply
Source:
The Death of Human Capital?
Author(s):

Phillip Brown

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190644307.003.0010

This chapter redefines labor supply within the context of the new human capital. It seeks to recapture a wider understanding of education and human capabilities, given long-standing objections to treating individuals as passive consumers of knowledge. Labor supply is thus understood as a way of developing individual freedom and rebuilding social cohesion at a time of profound social and economic change. The chapter points out that the relationship between individuals, education, and employment in an era of twentieth-century industrialism is no longer appropriate in an age of machine intelligence. What it means to be educated, along with what it means to be employable, changes in different economic and spatial contexts and in relation to different models of employment.

Keywords:   labor supply, education, individual freedom, social change, economic change, social cohesion, employment

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