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Child Composers in the Old ConservatoriesHow Orphans Became Elite Musicians$
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Robert O. Gjerdingen

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780190653590

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190653590.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 13 June 2021

Institutionalized Apprenticeship

Institutionalized Apprenticeship

London and Naples

Chapter:
(p.59) 5 Institutionalized Apprenticeship
Source:
Child Composers in the Old Conservatories
Author(s):

Robert O. Gjerdingen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190653590.003.0005

Apprenticeship was the normal way to learn a trade in past centuries. A typical master might have one or two apprentices, who lived in the master’s home like members of the family. A new path for apprentices opened up with the founding in London of the Inns of Court, four institutions to train future lawyers. The combination of famous teachers, a critical mass of talented students, and the experiences of seeing law practiced in a royal city all made this new type of apprenticeship superior to what came before. The same thing happened with music training in the four conservatories of Naples. Great teachers, strong competition, and world-class music in a royal city led to conservatory students winning the best music jobs in Europe.

Keywords:   Inns of Court, Charles Dickens, Apprenticeship, Thomas Hughes, Tom Brown’s Schooldays, David Copperfield, Situated learning

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