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Marius PetipaThe Emperor's Ballet Master$
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Nadine Meisner

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780190659295

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190659295.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 16 October 2021

Enter Vladimir Teliakovsky

Enter Vladimir Teliakovsky

Chapter:
(p.255) 10 Enter Vladimir Teliakovsky
Source:
Marius Petipa
Author(s):

Nadine Meisner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190659295.003.0011

Chapter 10 records the arrival of Teliakovsky as the new director. Championing the new artistic ideas that were flourishing in Moscow, he wanted to bring these to sclerotic St Petersburg where the flop of Petipa’s last big ballet, The Magic Mirror, epitomized just how out of touch Petipa was. Teliakovsky saw Petipa as finished, ‘a squeezed lemon’, and set about pushing him out. The reforms in theatre design, as represented by Konstantin Korovin and Alexander Golovin, meant there was revolution inside the theatres, just as there was revolution outside on the streets, with the march on the Winter Palace in 1905. The political fervour spread to elements in the ballet company, who wanted more control and the return of Petipa. But he was too old; the chapter concludes with his death in 1910 and the many tributes to him.

Keywords:   new ‘decadents’, Silver Age, Russian folk art, Konstantin Korovin, Alexander Golovin, The Magic Mirror, Diaghilev, Bloody Sunday

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