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Testing the Canon of Ancient Near Eastern Art and Archaeology$
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Amy Gansell and Ann Shafer

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780190673161

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190673161.001.0001

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The Canon of Ancient Iranian Art

The Canon of Ancient Iranian Art

From Grand Narratives to Local Perspectives

Chapter:
(p.111) Chapter 5 The Canon of Ancient Iranian Art
Source:
Testing the Canon of Ancient Near Eastern Art and Archaeology
Author(s):

Henry P. Colburn

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190673161.003.0005

The canon of ancient Iranian art coalesced during the heyday of archaeological research in Iran during the 1950s and 1960s. Scholars sought to reconcile both excavated material from a series of type sites and unexcavated objects, with a sequence of historical and cultural phases from Proto-Elamite to Sasanian. Consequently, the canon has some notable weaknesses. First, the term “Iranian” can refer to geography or people, either of which excludes important material. Second, the periodization of the canon relies on Mesopotamian and Mediterranean history, which is not always a good fit for Iran. Third, the use of style to assign material to these periods relies on the problematic assumption that multiple artistic styles cannot coexist at the same time and place. This chapter argues that it is useful to adopt an approach that focuses instead on individual sites or micro-regions, thus better reflecting the richness and diversity of ancient Iranian art.

Keywords:   archaeological type site, Edith Porada, forgery, Iran, Oxus Treasure, Persepolis, Persia, Roman Ghirshman, seals, style

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