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Youth, Jobs, and the FutureProblems and Prospects$
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Lynn S. Chancer, Martín Sánchez-Jankowski, and Christine Trost

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190685898

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190685898.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 30 November 2020

Time’s Up! Shorter Hours, Public Policy, and Time Flexibility as an Antidote to Youth Unemployment

Time’s Up! Shorter Hours, Public Policy, and Time Flexibility as an Antidote to Youth Unemployment

Chapter:
(p.219) 10 Time’s Up! Shorter Hours, Public Policy, and Time Flexibility as an Antidote to Youth Unemployment
Source:
Youth, Jobs, and the Future
Author(s):

Katherine Eva Maich

Jamie K. McCallum

Ari Grant-Sasson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190685898.003.0011

This chapter explores the relationship between hours of work and unemployment. When it comes to time spent working in the United States at present, two problems immediately come to light. First, an asymmetrical distribution of working time persists, with some people overworked and others underemployed. Second, hours are increasingly unstable; precarious on-call work scheduling and gig economy–style employment relationships are the canaries in the coal mine of a labor market that produces fewer and fewer stable jobs. It is possible that some kind of shorter hours movement, especially one that places an emphasis on young workers, has the potential to address these problems. Some policies and processes are already in place to transition into a shorter hours economy right now even if those possibilities are mediated by an anti-worker political administration.

Keywords:   working hours, unemployment, overtime, on-call scheduling, gig economy, shorter hours movement, young worker, work sharing, shorter hours economy

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