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Youth, Jobs, and the FutureProblems and Prospects$
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Lynn S. Chancer, Martín Sánchez-Jankowski, and Christine Trost

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190685898

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190685898.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 23 November 2020

Youth Unemployment and the Illicit Economy

Youth Unemployment and the Illicit Economy

Chapter:
(p.140) 7 Youth Unemployment and the Illicit Economy
Source:
Youth, Jobs, and the Future
Author(s):

Martín Sánchez-Jankowski

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190685898.003.0008

This chapter focuses on factors that led youth to initially participate in the illicit economy, stay involved, or decide to leave. Part of the cultural landscape that directly applies to employment has changed and will likely continue to change. Presently, there are individuals in both the lower and middle classes who think it is only acceptable to work at a job worthy of their labor. Therefore, it is now considered more acceptable to forgo working and assume the unemployment designation while waiting for the best job fit. This culture shift has expanded to such an extent as to currently allow individuals from divergent income groups the ability to justify their participation in the illicit economy. Ultimately, clear economic incentives pull individuals into this economy, but additional social and psychological factors influence involvement as well.

Keywords:   illicit economy, youth unemployment, economic incentive, job fit, social factor, psychological factor

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