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Asymmetrical NeighborsBorderland State Building between China and Southeast Asia$
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Enze Han

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780190688301

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190688301.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 22 September 2021

Dynamics of Transboundary Economic Flows

Dynamics of Transboundary Economic Flows

Chapter:
(p.92) 6 Dynamics of Transboundary Economic Flows
Source:
Asymmetrical Neighbors
Author(s):

Enze Han

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190688301.003.0006

Chapter 6 discusses the economic logic of cross-border relations. To illustrate the economic dynamics of borderland state building as a result of economic asymmetry between Myanmar and its two more powerful neighbors, this chapter mainly examines two interrelated processes. The first is cross-border movement of goods and people between China, Myanmar, and Thailand. The chapter specifically examines the phenomenon of labor migration from Myanmar to Thailand, as well as the integrated trade networks across the borderland. It also discusses cross-border resource development dominated by Chinese as well as Thai capital in Myanmar. Here it mainly looks at agribusiness as well as investment in the hydropower, lumber, and mining sectors in Myanmar’s Kachin and Shan states.

Keywords:   cross-border trade, economic flows, labor migration, resource exploitation in Myanmar, Southeast Asia economy

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