Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Adam SmithSystematic Philosopher and Public Thinker$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Eric Schliesser

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190690120

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190690120.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 24 October 2020

Passionate Human Nature

Passionate Human Nature

Chapter:
(p.25) 2 Passionate Human Nature
Source:
Adam Smith
Author(s):

Eric Schliesser

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190690120.003.0002

The aim of this chapter is to offer a detailed survey of the main elements of Smith’s understanding of human nature in order to understand his views on human flourishing as it is fleshed out in his moral psychology, his moral theory, his philosophy of science, and his political economy. In addition this chapter offers a succinct introduction to “Smithian social explanation.” This chapter also introduces Smith’s account of the passions. In TMS Smith treats primarily of moral sentiments—that is, only a subset of all the passions. This chapter argues that in addition to the moral sentiments, Smith recognizes other sentiments: the so-called natural sentiments and the intellectual sentiments. This chapter embeds Smith’s theory of the passions in his understanding of the historical development of human propensities, including language, cognition, and reason.

Keywords:   Smith, Smithian social explanation, intellectual sentiments, natural sentiments, moral sentiments

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .