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Nature Behind Barbed WireAn Environmental History of the Japanese American Incarceration$
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Connie Y. Chiang

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190842062

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190842062.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 04 August 2021

Dispersal, Resettlement, Return

Dispersal, Resettlement, Return

Chapter:
(p.175) 7 Dispersal, Resettlement, Return
Source:
Nature Behind Barbed Wire
Author(s):

Connie Y. Chiang

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190842062.003.0008

It would be easy to conclude with the end of the war, the closing of the camps, and the departure of the last detainees. However, the environmental history of the incarceration extended into the postwar years. This chapter explores the postwar experiences of Japanese American farmers as they left the camps toward the end of the war. Some started anew in the inland West and cultivated land there, while other tried to pick up their lives back on the Pacific Coast. In both cases, they encountered numerous environmental challenges, from unfamiliar growing conditions to neglected, overgrown land. They also confronted hostile or suspicious neighbors and land and housing shortages. Postwar resettlement was yet another environmental process to which Japanese Americans had to adapt.

Keywords:   Japanese Americans, postwar, agriculture, farming, Pacific Coast, Colorado, Utah

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