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The Long CrisisNew York City and the Path to Neoliberalism$
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Benjamin Holtzman

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9780190843700

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190843700.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 08 December 2021

Remaking Public Parks

Remaking Public Parks

Chapter:
(p.95) 3 Remaking Public Parks
Source:
The Long Crisis
Author(s):

Benjamin Holtzman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190843700.003.0004

This chapter examines the decline and subsequent revitalization of major parks through their control by public–private partnerships in the late twentieth century. The extensive private sector involvement in parks was far from the elite-initiated takeover that has been depicted. In contrast, this shift dates back to community residents’ organizing in the late 1960s and 1970s to revive degenerating greenspaces that had suffered municipal neglect. What first began as community park revitalization efforts in neighborhoods throughout New York spread to initiatives that involved broader elements of the private sector. Indeed, the subsequent involvement of businesses and corporations in the care and management of parks was spurred by years of campaigns by concerned residents, nonprofits, cultural institutions, and officials who had lost faith in the ability of local government to maintain parks, ultimately catalyzing the growth of public–private partnerships to manage city parks by the end of the century.

Keywords:   parks, public–private partnerships, Central Park, Bryant Park, New York City, neoliberalism, 1970s

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