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Cracks in the Ivory TowerThe Moral Mess of Higher Education$
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Jason Brennan and Phillip Magness

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780190846282

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190846282.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 July 2021

Answering Taxpayers

Answering Taxpayers

Chapter:
(p.258) 11 Answering Taxpayers
Source:
Cracks in the Ivory Tower
Author(s):

Jason Brennan

Phillip Magness

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190846282.003.0011

This chapter considers the many perks enjoyed by colleges at the expense of taxpayers. American colleges and universities spend about half a trillion dollars a year on direct operations. Federal, state, and local governments cover a large portion of these expenses. Overall, colleges get about 37 percent of their revenue from the government. This number does not include indirect spending, such as the public goods colleges consume without having to pay taxes. Colleges do not pay for roads, police, fire departments, military defense, and so on, in the communities where they operate. They also enjoy substantial tax benefits on everything from the property they own to the purchases they make to the way they invest money under their endowments. Thus, colleges receive other hidden subsidies and perks not reflected in those numbers.

Keywords:   universities, colleges, taxation, higher education, taxes

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