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Great Power RisingTheodore Roosevelt and the Politics of U.S. Foreign Policy$
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John M. Thompson

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780190859954

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190859954.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 29 November 2021

Foolish Offensiveness

Foolish Offensiveness

Relations with Japan, 1905–1909

Chapter:
(p.120) 6 Foolish Offensiveness
Source:
Great Power Rising
Author(s):

John M. Thompson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190859954.003.0007

Chapter 6 considers US-Japanese relations from 1905 to 1909. It examines several sources of tension, including an anti-Japanese movement that was particularly strong among organized labor in San Francisco, sensationalist newspapers in both countries, and concerns that Japan would attack the Philippines or Hawaii. The chapter argues that Roosevelt sought to strike a delicate balance in relations with Tokyo by protecting Japanese already in the United States, but also reducing the inflow of immigrants to mollify anti-Japanese sentiment. In an effort to upgrade US capabilities in the event of war, the president also convinced Congress to build additional battleships and sent the navy on a cruise around the world. TR also viewed the cruise as a way to increase public support for naval expansion.

Keywords:   Japan, Elihu Root, navy, sensationalism, William Randolph Hearst, Philippines, Hawaii, California, San Francisco, organized labor

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