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Complex BattlespacesThe Law of Armed Conflict and the Dynamics of Modern Warfare$
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Winston S. Williams and Christopher M. Ford

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780190915360

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190915360.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 January 2022

Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems

Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems

Is It the End of the World as We Know It . . . Or Will We Be Just Fine?

Chapter:
(p.289) 10 Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems
Source:
Complex Battlespaces
Author(s):

Michael W. Meier

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190915360.003.0010

Over the past decade, there has been a proliferation of remotely piloted aircraft or “drones” being used on the battlefield. Advances in technology are going to continue to drive changes in how future conflicts will be waged. Technological innovation, however, is not without its detractors as there are various groups calling for a moratorium or ban on the development and use of autonomous weapons systems. Some groups have called for a prohibition on the development, production, and use of fully autonomous weapons through an international legally binding instrument, while others view advances in the use of technology on the battlefield as a natural progression that will continue to make weapons systems more discriminate. The unanswered question is, which point of view will be the right one? This chapter approaches this question by addressing the meaning of “autonomy” and “autonomous weapons systems.” In addition, this chapter looks at the U.S. Department of Defense’s vision for the potential employment of autonomous systems, the legal principle applicable to these systems, and the weapons review process.

Keywords:   autonomy, autonomous weapons system, automated, international law, proportionality, distinction, unnecessary suffering, indiscriminate, acquisition, weapons review

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