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William W. Eaton and M. Daniele Fallin

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780190916602

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190916602.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 June 2021

Adult Mental Disorders in Association with Socioeconomic Position, Race/Ethnicity, and Sexual and Gender Minority Status

Adult Mental Disorders in Association with Socioeconomic Position, Race/Ethnicity, and Sexual and Gender Minority Status

Chapter:
(p.169) 7 Adult Mental Disorders in Association with Socioeconomic Position, Race/Ethnicity, and Sexual and Gender Minority Status
Source:
Public Mental Health
Author(s):

Renee M. Johnson

Sabriya Linton

Preben Bo Mortensen

Sari L. Reisner

Silvia Martins

William W. Eaton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190916602.003.0008

This chapter presents information about differences in risk for mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders across three demographic factors that are tied to social disadvantage: socioeconomic position, race/ethnicity, and sexual and gender minority status. It summarizes key results from studies of the general population, and presents information on prevalence and risk based on our analyses of national data sets. Systematic population subgroup differences exist. Persons in low socioeconomic position and sexual and gender minorities have higher odds of mental and behavioral disorders. Findings for racial/ethnic minorities were mixed. Although several studies showing that Black and Hispanic people have lower risk than Whites for mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders, research also shows that disorders among these groups are more severe and more persistent.

Keywords:   mental health, disparity, psychiatric epidemiology, sexual and gender minorities, socioeconomic position, race/ethnicity, substance use epidemiology

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