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Mobilized by InjusticeCriminal Justice Contact, Political Participation, and Race$
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Hannah L. Walker

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780190940645

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190940645.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 22 January 2022

Injustice in Black and White

Injustice in Black and White

Chapter:
(p.75) 4 Injustice in Black and White
Source:
Mobilized by Injustice
Author(s):

Hannah L. Walker

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190940645.003.0004

Chapter 4 examines the divergent narratives leveraged by White and Black Americans to make sense of their carceral experiences. In-depth interviews suggest that Whites arrive at a sense of injustice through the lens of class, whereas Blacks centralize race, layered with classed undertones. Data from the Harvard-Kaiser Foundation African American Men’s Survey (AAMS 2006) supports this perspective. Yet, when they view their experiences through the lens of injustice, both groups translate their systemic analyses into political action. Findings from the NCPS suggest that the mobilizing effect is most pronounced among those with proximal contact and is particularly important for the participation of Black Americans, since among this group absent injustice proximal contact is negatively associated with participation.

Keywords:   New Jim Crow, class, poverty, political economy, inequality

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