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Information HuntersWhen Librarians, Soldiers, and Spies Banded Together in World War II Europe$
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Kathy Peiss

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780190944612

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190944612.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 23 June 2021

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.208) Conclusion
Source:
Information Hunters
Author(s):

Kathy Peiss

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190944612.003.0010

The collecting missions made an imprint on the postwar world of books and information. The OSS and military efforts to acquire open-source intelligence propelled advances in library and information science already underway. A number of those involved in wartime acquisitions became pioneers in this field. The program of acquisition offered a prototype for open-source intelligence gathering after the war. These missions also contributed to a growing orientation among American libraries toward internationalism, in which collecting foreign holdings was deemed essential to American power. For the most part, however, the collections themselves attracted little notice. With the Holocaust awareness of the late twentieth century, the acquisition of looted Jewish books was investigated by the Justice Department and President Bill Clinton’s Commission on Holocaust Assets. Looted and displaced books remain part of the unfinished business of World War II.

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