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Building Better Social ProgramsHow Evidence Is Transforming Public Policy$
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David Stoesz

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780190945572

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190945572.001.0001

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Innovation

Innovation

Chapter:
(p.295) Chapter 15 Innovation
Source:
Building Better Social Programs
Author(s):

David Stoesz

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190945572.003.0016

Evidence-based policy can serve as a disruptive innovation if it is modified in accord with the circumstances of the typical agency director. Behavioral economics has implications for introducing RCTs in social care, addressing the inertia that typifies community based services. Four recommendations can make RCTs more visible and instrumental in policy reform: (1) deploying innovations to rural areas and small towns and testing them rigorously, (2) altering federal tiered funding so that half of allocations are for programming demonstrated by multiple RCTs, (3) modifying MIT’s MicroMasters for domestic programming, and (4) developing a “randomista” award for researchers making substantial contributions to the evidence-based policy movement. Collaboration between private and public sectors will be essential for expanding the evidence-based policy movement.

Keywords:   randomized controlled trials, social administration, policy reform, public-private partnerships

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