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War and Peace in SomaliaNational Grievances, Local Conflict and Al-Shabaab$
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Michael Keating and Matt Waldman

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780190947910

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190947910.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 23 November 2020

Local Reconciliation in Somalia

Local Reconciliation in Somalia

The Prospects for Sustainable Peace

Chapter:
(p.117) Local Reconciliation in Somalia
Source:
War and Peace in Somalia
Author(s):

Abukar Sanei

Mohamed A. Omar

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190947910.003.0009

The last Somali central government was overthrown in 1991 due to grievances among those who felt they were marginalized from the decision-making process. The same grievances have driven the civil war that started in 1991 and continues to this day. To bring stability to Somalia, genuine reconciliation at the local level is vital. This chapter addresses the mechanisms and prospects for local reconciliation. To identify mechanisms for reconciliation it carried out a survey of 114 people, and conducted three in-depth interviews with current and former officials. To resolve grievances, 59 per cent of survey respondents stated that viable options are: creating a format for power sharing, integrating the security forces, using the media to promote peace, and including women and youth in the reconciliation process; 44 per cent of respondents also supported the establishment of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and ending impunity by establishing an effective system of local justice.

Keywords:   Somalia, local conflict, reconciliation, power sharing, peace, local justice

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