Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy, Volume X$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Donald Rutherford

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9780192897442

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2021

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780192897442.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 23 October 2021

Knowledge and Sensory Knowledge in Hume’s Treatise

Knowledge and Sensory Knowledge in Hume’s Treatise

Chapter:
(p.195) 7 Knowledge and Sensory Knowledge in Hume’s Treatise
Source:
Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy, Volume X
Author(s):

Graham Clay

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780192897442.003.0007

I argue that the Hume of the Treatise maintains an account of knowledge according to which (i) every instance of knowledge must be an immediately present perception (i.e., an impression or an idea); (ii) an object of this perception must be a token of a knowable relation; (iii) this token knowable relation must have parts of the instance of knowledge as relata (i.e., the same perception that has it as an object); and any perception that satisfies (i)–(iii) is an instance of knowledge. I then apply this account to the case of sense perception. I argue that Hume holds that relations of impressions can be intuited, are knowable, and are necessary. For Hume, these relations constitute sensory knowledge. While Hume is rightly labeled an empiricist for many reasons, a close inspection of his account of knowledge reveals yet another way in which he deserves the label.

Keywords:   Hume, empiricism, sensory knowledge; relations of ideas; relations of impressions, Hume’s Fork, Constitutive Account

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .