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Measuring Well-Being: Interdisciplinary Perspectives from the Social Sciences and the Humanities

Matthew T. Lee, Laura D. Kubzansky, and Tyler J. VanderWeele

Abstract

This edited volume explores conceptual and practical challenges in measuring well-being. Given the bewildering array of measures available and ambiguity regarding when and how to measure particular aspects of well-being, knowledge in the field can be difficult to reconcile. Representing numerous disciplines including psychology, economics, sociology, statistics, public health, theology, and philosophy, contributors consider the philosophical and theological traditions on happiness, well-being, and the good life, as well as recent empirical research on well-being and its measurement. Leveraging ... More

Keywords: well-being, flourishing, eudaimonia, health, measurement, interdisciplinary research, philosophy, theology, psychology, epidemiology

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2021 Print ISBN-13: 9780197512531
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2021 DOI:10.1093/oso/9780197512531.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Matthew T. Lee, editor
Director of Empirical Research, Human Flourishing Program, Institute for Quantitative Social Science, Harvard University

Laura D. Kubzansky, editor
Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Co-Director of the Center for Health and Happiness, Harvard University

Tyler J. VanderWeele, editor
John L. Loeb and Frances Lehman Loeb Professor of Epidemiology, Harvard University

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Contents

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Front Matter

Introduction

Matthew T. Lee, Laura D. Kubzansky, and Tyler J. VanderWeele

Part 1 Empirical Research and Reflections on Well-Being Measurement

3 Assessments of Societal Subjective Well-Being

Louis Tay, Andrew T. Jebb, and Victoria S. Scotney

4 Eudaimonic and Hedonic Well-Being

Carol D. Ryff, Jennifer Morozink Boylan, and Julie A. Kirsch

5 A Review of Psychological Well-Being and Mortality Risk

Claudia Trudel-Fitzgerald, Laura D. Kubzansky, and Tyler J. VanderWeele

Part 2 Conceptual Reflections on Well-Being Measurement

10 Human Flourishing

Neil G. Messer

Part 3 Advancing the Conversation About Measurement

12 The Comprehensive Measure of Meaning

Jeffrey A. Hanson and Tyler J. VanderWeele

13 Empirical Relationships Among Five Types of Well-Being

Seth Margolis, Eric Schwitzgebel, Daniel J. Ozer, and Sonja Lyubomirsky

16 Tradition-Specific Measures of Spiritual Well-Being

Tyler J. VanderWeele, Katelyn N. G. Long, and Michael J. Balboni

Part 4 Scholarly Dialogue on the Science of Well-Being

17 Current Recommendations on the Selection of Measures for Well-Being

Tyler J. VanderWeele, Claudia Trudel-Fitzgerald, Paul V. Allin, Colin Farrelly, Guy Fletcher, Donald E. Frederick, Jon Hall, John F. Helliwell, Eric S. Kim, William A. Lauinger, Matthew T. Lee, Sonja Lyubomirsky, Seth Margolis, Eileen McNeely, Neil G. Messer, Louis Tay, K. Vish Viswanath, Dorota Węziak-Białowolska, and Laura D. Kubzansky

18 Advancing the Science of Well-Being

Carol D. Ryff, Jennifer Morozink Boylan, and Julie A. Kirsch

19 Response to “Advancing the Science of Well-Being: A Dissenting View on Measurement Recommendations”

Tyler J. VanderWeele, Claudia Trudel-Fitzgerald, and Laura D. Kubzansky

20 Response to Response

Carol D. Ryff, Jennifer Morozink Boylan, and Julie A. Kirsch

Conclusion

Matthew T. Lee, Laura D. Kubzansky, and Tyler J. VanderWeele