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The Camera LiesActing for Hitchcock$
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Dan Callahan

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780197515327

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780197515327.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 29 July 2021

Dial M for Murder, Rear Window, To Catch a Thief, The Trouble with Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much

Dial M for Murder, Rear Window, To Catch a Thief, The Trouble with Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much

Chapter:
(p.172) 13 Dial M for Murder, Rear Window, To Catch a Thief, The Trouble with Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much
Source:
The Camera Lies
Author(s):

Dan Callahan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780197515327.003.0013

In three films, Hitchcock drew out and glorified the young blonde Grace Kelly. In Dial M for Murder (1954), the Master put her through an ordeal and began to get her to relax on camera, and then in Rear Window (1954), he emphasized all of Kelly’s non-naturalistic strengths while allowing James Stewart to do some of the most nuanced acting in all of Hitchcock as the voyeuristic photographer L.B. Jefferies. Finally, Hitchcock presented Kelly as the sexiest of ice blondes in To Catch a Thief (1955), where she pursued Cary Grant along the French Riviera. Hitchcock got understated work from his cast in the macabre comedy The Trouble with Harry (1955), and then he probed the persona of Doris Day in a remake of The Man Who Knew Too Much, with results that were both genuinely painful and just slightly “too much.”

Keywords:   Grace Kelly, James Stewart, Thelma Ritter, Rear Window, Doris Day

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