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Conversion to IslamCompeting Themes in Early Islamic Historiography$
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Ayman S. Ibrahim

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9780197530719

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2021

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780197530719.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 26 September 2021

Precursors of Conversion Themes under the Umayyads

Precursors of Conversion Themes under the Umayyads

Chapter:
(p.31) 2 Precursors of Conversion Themes under the Umayyads
Source:
Conversion to Islam
Author(s):

Ayman S. Ibrahim

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780197530719.003.0002

Chapter 2 is devoted to sources attributed to pre-ᶜAbbāsid writers, who lived and wrote during the Umayyad Caliphate: Sulaym ibn Qays (d. 76/695), Ibn Shihāb al-Zuhrī (d. 124/741), and Mūsā ibn ᶜUqba (d. 135/752). These sources are problematic for various reasons, examined extensively in the first section of the chapter. The chapter then focuses on the literary descriptions of conversion and detectable themes. This chapter demonstrates how the earliest available historical reports include precursors of conversion themes, which are to be developed, used, or reinterpreted under the ᶜAbbāsid rule. Chapter 2 argues that, since the genesis of Muslim historical writing, religious historians not only emphasized conversion but also used it to advance their religious views and support their political agendas.

Keywords:   Shīᶜite, conversion to Islam, Islamic studies, Umayyad, Zuhri, Muhammad’s biography, Muslim historiography, Abbasid studies, medieval Islam, medieval historiography

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