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Reconsidering American Civil-Military RelationsThe Military, Society, Politics, and Modern War$
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Lionel Beehner, Risa Brooks, and Daniel Maurer

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9780197535493

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780197535493.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 November 2021

Light Footprint, Low Profile, Low Information

Light Footprint, Low Profile, Low Information

Civil-Military Relations and the 2017 Niger Attacks

Chapter:
(p.209) 11 Light Footprint, Low Profile, Low Information
Source:
Reconsidering American Civil-Military Relations
Author(s):

Alice Hunt Friend

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780197535493.003.0012

This chapter examines the following questions: How do operations conducted “below the threshold” of major war affect U S civil-military relations? Conversely, how does the state of civil-military relations inform the public’s perceptions of these kinds of military engagements? In recent years the U S armed forces, especially ground forces and special operators, have spent the balance of their deployments conducting so-called low-intensity conflict or irregular warfare. This chapter examines the existing scholarship on the relationships between U S civil-military relations and Americans’ perceptions of modern military operations. It then refers to responses to the October 2017 ambush in Niger to generate insights and hypotheses about the interactions between the state of civil-military relations and public perceptions of light- footprint and (previously) low- profile operations.

Keywords:   special operations forces, Africa, modern war, Niger attacks, public perceptions

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