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Europe's Income, Wealth, Consumption, and Inequality$
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Georg Fischer and Robert Strauss

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9780197545706

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2021

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780197545706.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 14 June 2021

Europe’s Migration Experience and Its Effects on Economic Inequality

Europe’s Migration Experience and Its Effects on Economic Inequality

Chapter:
(p.486) 14 Europe’s Migration Experience and Its Effects on Economic Inequality
Source:
Europe's Income, Wealth, Consumption, and Inequality
Author(s):

Martin Guzi

Martin Kahanec

Magdalena M. Ulceluse

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780197545706.003.0014

This chapter provides the historical context for the past half-century in Europe, focusing specifically on the link between migration and economic development and inequality. The literature review suggests that there are several channels through which migration affects economic inequality between countries in one or the other direction, and it may decrease inequality within countries. The net effects are an open empirical question and are likely to depend on the institutional and policy context, sources and destinations of migration, and its type. The authors undertake an empirical analysis and find that immigration has contributed to reducing inequality within the 25 European Union (EU) countries over the 2003–2017 period. As the EU has attracted mostly high-skilled immigrants throughout this period, the authors’ results are consistent with the ameliorating effect of high-skilled migration on within-country inequality, as predicted by theory.

Keywords:   immigration, inequality, labour mobility, income distribution, EU enlargement

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