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The Appearance of CorruptionTesting the Supreme Court's Assumptions about Campaign Finance Reform$
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Daron R. Shaw, Brian E. Roberts, and Mijeong Baek

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9780197548417

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780197548417.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 24 June 2021

Perceived Corruption and Political Participation

Perceived Corruption and Political Participation

Chapter:
(p.83) 5 Perceived Corruption and Political Participation
Source:
The Appearance of Corruption
Author(s):

Daron R. Shaw

Brian E. Roberts

Mijeong Baek

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780197548417.003.0005

Chapter 5 shifts the focus to the final—and perhaps most important—element of the Court’s behavioral model: political participation. Adopting a broad and comprehensive scale of political participation that includes both voting as well as other forms of engagement, it first estimates the relationships between attitudes toward corruption and trust on participation. The data offer little support for the notion that those who see more corruption and those who are less trusting of government are less likely to participate. Equally important, campaign finance regulations and campaign spending have a minimal influence on political participation. In fact, increased spending appears to coincide with slightly more participation.

Keywords:   campaign finance laws, political participation, turnout, corruption, trust in government, money in politics, campaign spending, campaign finance reform

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