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The Decline of Natural LawHow American Lawyers Once Used Natural Law and Why They Stopped$
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Stuart Banner

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9780197556498

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2021

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780197556498.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 04 December 2021

Substitutes for Natural Law

Substitutes for Natural Law

Chapter:
(p.188) 8 Substitutes for Natural Law
Source:
The Decline of Natural Law
Author(s):

Stuart Banner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780197556498.003.0009

This chapter offers a fresh perspective on some familiar aspects of the legal thought of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, by connecting them to the decline of natural law. Much of what we now call classical legal thought can be understood as the profession’s attempt to find a substitute for natural law, either by replicating the method of natural law with principles found elsewhere than in nature or by bringing natural law into the courtroom indirectly through positive law. At the same time, the decline of natural law led to the emergence of the view that judges are makers, not finders, of law.

Keywords:   classical legal thought, classical orthodoxy, substantive due process, historical jurisprudence, legal realism, law and economics, legal science, Christopher Langdell

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