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The Oxford History of Protestant Dissenting Traditions, Volume IThe Post-Reformation Era, 1559-1689$
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John Coffey

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780198702238

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198702238.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 13 June 2021

Presbyterians in the Restoration

Presbyterians in the Restoration

Chapter:
(p.73) 3 Presbyterians in the Restoration*
Source:
The Oxford History of Protestant Dissenting Traditions, Volume I
Author(s):

George Southcombe

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198702238.003.0004

This chapter examines the ways in which Presbyterian identity was reluctantly refashioned in the late seventeenth century. It discusses the failure of the Presbyterian political and religious programmes at the Restoration, and emphasizes the implications of these failures for the future of Presbyterianism. It shows how living under the penal code meant that Presbyterians adopted practices that could evolve into a structure independent of the national Church, at the same time as demonstrating that hopes for comprehension continued throughout the period. It traces the ultimate reasons for the failure of comprehension, and the processes by which a distinct Presbyterian identity emerged. It concludes by examining some of the ways in which the history of Restoration Presbyterianism might not simply be a history of failure, and suggests its broader impact on English politics and religion.

Keywords:   Presbyterians, Puritanism, comprehension, toleration, Act of Uniformity, Toleration Act, religious identity

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