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Perceptual Imagination and Perceptual Memory$
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Fiona Macpherson and Fabian Dorsch

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198717881

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198717881.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 November 2020

Imagining the Past

Imagining the Past

On the Nature of Episodic Memory

Chapter:
(p.46) 4 Imagining the Past
Source:
Perceptual Imagination and Perceptual Memory
Author(s):

Robert Hopkins

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198717881.003.0004

What kind of mental state is episodic memory? This chapter defends the claim that it is, in key part, imagining the past, where the imagining in question is experiential imagining. To remember a past episode is to experientially imagine how things were, in a way controlled by one’s past experience of that episode. This view is motivated by appeal both to patterns of compatibilities and incompatibilities between various states, and to phenomenology. The bulk of the chapter defends the account against four objections. Imagining and remembering seem to differ in whether they are active or passive, in the forms of singular content they involve, in their relations to observation, and in their relations to belief. The chapter argues that these differences can be accommodated, and some even explained, once we flesh out what else is involved in episodic memory, in addition to imagining the past.

Keywords:   episodic memory, experiential imagining, active/passive, singular content, observation, belief

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