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Collaborative RememberingTheories, Research, and Applications$
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Michelle L. Meade, Celia B. Harris, Penny Van Bergen, John Sutton, and Amanda J. Barnier

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198737865

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198737865.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 03 December 2020

Parent–Child Construction of Personal Memories in Reminiscing Conversations: Implications for the Development and Treatment of Childhood Psychopathology

Parent–Child Construction of Personal Memories in Reminiscing Conversations: Implications for the Development and Treatment of Childhood Psychopathology

Chapter:
(p.334) Chapter 19 Parent–Child Construction of Personal Memories in Reminiscing Conversations: Implications for the Development and Treatment of Childhood Psychopathology
Source:
Collaborative Remembering
Author(s):

Karen Salmon

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198737865.003.0019

Strong theory and research implicates parent–child conversations about the past in the child’s development of critical skills, including autobiographical memory and understanding of emotion and minds. Yet very little research has focused on associations between reminiscing and the development of childhood psychopathology. This chapter considers what is known about reminiscing between parents and children where there is anxiety or conduct problems. These findings provide clues as to how children come to manifest difficulties in autobiographical memory and emotion competence. Thereafter, the text reviews studies that have attempted to alter the style and content of parent–child reminiscing in clinical populations. The full implications of parent–child reminiscing, as a rich context for children’s development, have yet to be realized in clinically relevant research.

Keywords:   child, language and conversation, parent–child reminiscing, anxiety, conduct problems, child treatment

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