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Collaborative RememberingTheories, Research, and Applications$
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Michelle L. Meade, Celia B. Harris, Penny Van Bergen, John Sutton, and Amanda J. Barnier

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198737865

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198737865.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 04 December 2020

Socializing Early Skills for Remembering Through Parent–Child Conversations During and After Events

Socializing Early Skills for Remembering Through Parent–Child Conversations During and After Events

Chapter:
(p.19) Chapter 2 Socializing Early Skills for Remembering Through Parent–Child Conversations During and After Events
Source:
Collaborative Remembering
Author(s):

Catherine A. Haden

Maria Marcus

Erin Jant

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198737865.003.0002

In this chapter, we provide an overview of how conversations children have with their parents about events—both as they unfold and after they have occurred—can affect children’s memory for personal experiences. We begin with a discussion of the ways parents reminisce with their children about past experiences and the implications of individual differences in reminiscing styles for children’s developing event and autobiographical memory skills. Then we turn to consider how parent–child conversations as events unfold can influence understanding, encoding, and subsequent remembering. We conclude by drawing attention to potential multiplicative effects of different types of event talk for children’s learning and remembering, and how parent–child conversations during and after events may support children’s deliberate memory skills.

Keywords:   autobiographical memory, deliberate remembering, event memory, parent–child conversation, reminiscing

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