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Attention, Not Self$
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Jonardon Ganeri

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198757405

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198757405.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 18 September 2021

Working Memory and Attention

Working Memory and Attention

Chapter:
(p.201) 10 Working Memory and Attention
Source:
Attention, Not Self
Author(s):

Jonardon Ganeri

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198757405.003.0010

Increasingly it is recognized that selection is not the only function of attention; rather, ‘attention gates what comes to be encoded into short-term memory, helps maintain information in short-term memory, and dynamically modulates the information being maintained’ (Nobre and Kastner 2014: 1215; my italics). Recent empirical literature affirms the existence of early and late selective attention as distinct attentional phenomena but points to a dissociation between selective attention of either sort and maintenance of information in working memory. This chapter will demonstrate that the Buddhist concept of javana ‘running’ is a concept of working memory and that all the processes in Buddhaghosa’s pathway to consciousness are associated with functional roles that are actually realized by recognized entities in psychology and neuroscience.

Keywords:   philosophy of mind, Buddhist philosophy, working memory, gate-keeping, internal monitoring, global workspace, Buddhaghosa

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