Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Reading Republican OratoryReconstructions, Contexts, Receptions$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Christa Gray, Andrea Balbo, Richard M. A. Marshall, and Catherine E. W. Steel

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198788201

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198788201.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 October 2021

Traces of Actio in Fragmentary Roman Orators

Traces of Actio in Fragmentary Roman Orators

Chapter:
(p.227) 13 Traces of Actio in Fragmentary Roman Orators
Source:
Reading Republican Oratory
Author(s):

Andrea Balbo

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198788201.003.0014

Collecting references to the actio of fragmentary orators, this chapter explores the theoretical aspects of using the whole body (including both the speaker’s vocal delivery and his body language,) in public speaking. The evidence, despite its fragmentary nature, is contextualized using the advice given by the ancient rhetorical handbooks of Cicero and Quintilian on oratorical delivery, and related to modern theories of communication. The lack of a precise theoretical framework for actio in antiquity is argued to have allowed ancient theoreticians and practitioners considerable freedom for the representation and adoption of various elements of non-vocal delivery in their treatises and speeches.

Keywords:   actio, public speaking, delivery, gesture, ancient rhetorical theory, ancient rhetorical handbooks, fragmentary orators

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .