Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Philosophy and Model Theory$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Tim Button and Sean Walsh

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198790396

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198790396.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 October 2021

Categoricity and the sets

Categoricity and the sets

Chapter:
(p.171) 8 Categoricity and the sets
Source:
Philosophy and Model Theory
Author(s):

Tim Button

Sean Walsh

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198790396.003.0008

In this chapter, the focus shifts from numbers to sets. Again, no first-order set theory can hope to get anywhere near categoricity, but Zermelo famously proved the quasi-categoricity of second-order set theory. As in the previous chapter, we must ask who is entitled to invoke full second-order logic. That question is as subtle as before, and raises the same problem for moderate modelists. However, the quasi-categorical nature of Zermelo's Theorem gives rise to some specific questions concerning the aims of axiomatic set theories. Given the status of Zermelo's Theorem in the philosophy of set theory, we include a stand-alone proof of this theorem. We also prove a similar quasi-categoricity for Scott-Potter set theory, a theory which axiomatises the idea of an arbitrary stage of the iterative hierarchy.

Keywords:   Transitive models, Zermelo’s Quasi-Categoricity Theorem, The Iterative Conception, Martin, Scott-Potter Set Theory, Isaacson

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .