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Advancing Human DevelopmentTheory and Practice$
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Frances Stewart, Gustav Ranis, and Emma Samman

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198794455

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198794455.001.0001

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Success and Failure in Human Development, 1980–2014

Success and Failure in Human Development, 1980–2014

Chapter:
(p.74) 4 Success and Failure in Human Development, 1980–2014
Source:
Advancing Human Development
Author(s):

Frances Stewart

Gustav Ranis

Emma Samman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198794455.003.0004

This chapter analyses performance in human development over a thirty-five-year period, identifying the most and least successful countries in the main developing regions, on the basis of the classifications put forward in Chapter 3. The chapter finds that there are no unique patterns leading to success or failure; rather, there are alternative paths to either positive or negative outcomes, with varying combinations of economic growth, inequality, and social expenditures. However, successful countries on improvement in basic human development tended to have higher secondary enrolments and better female/male ratios in secondary enrolment. Successful countries on basic human development did worse on environment than the weak performers. The failure countries mostly had poor economic growth and had often suffered conflict. Looking at dimensions beyond health, education, and incomes, the chapter finds no strong correlation between success in basic human development and other dimensions of human development, notably political freedoms, security, or inequality.

Keywords:   inequality, economic growth, political freedom, human development, conflict, environment

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