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Insect Behavior – From Mechanisms to Ecological and Evolutionary Consequences - Oxford Scholarship Online
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Insect Behavior: From Mechanisms to Ecological and Evolutionary Consequences

Alex Córdoba-Aguilar, Daniel González-Tokman, and Isaac González-Santoyo

Abstract

The astonishing diversity of insects is well reflected at their behavioral level. This book summarizes the main behavioral findings and maintreams at different hierarchichal levels of insect behavior as well as how this information could be understood and used in terms of pest and vector control, and conservation biology. It contains 22 chapters written by leading authorities in the field, using a didactic language. Both advanced students and professionals will find this text an important source of reference and research ideas.

Keywords: insect, behavior, genetic, physiology, ecology, evolution, pest and vector control

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2018 Print ISBN-13: 9780198797500
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2018 DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198797500.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Alex Córdoba-Aguilar, editor
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

Daniel González-Tokman, editor
Instituto de Ecología, México

Isaac González-Santoyo, editor
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

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Contents

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Chapter 1 Introduction

Daniel González-Tokman1, Isaac González-Santoyo2, and Alex Córdoba-Aguilar3 1 CONACYT, Red de Ecoetología, Instituto de Ecología, A. C. Xalapa, México 2 Departamento de Psicobiología y Neurociencias, Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. CdMx México 3 Departamento de Ecología Evolutiva, Instituto de Ecología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. CdMx, México

Chapter 2 The genetics of reproductive behavior

John Hunt1,2, James Rapkin1, and Clarissa House2 1 Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, Penryn, TR10 9EZ, UK 2 School of Science and Health and the Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, Western Sydney University, Hawkesbury Campus, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW, Australia

Chapter 3 Neurobiology

Anne C. von Philipsborn, danish Research Institute of Translational Neuroscience (DANDRITE), Aarhus University, Ole Worms Alle 3, Building 1170, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark

Chapter 4 The role of hormones

H. Frederik Nijhout and Emily Laub, department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA

Chapter 5 Phenotypic plasticity

Karen D. Williams and Marla B. Sokolowski, department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, Canada

Chapter 6 Habitat selection and territoriality

Darrell J. Kemp, department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde, New South Wales, Australia

Chapter 7 Long-range migration and orientation behavior

Don R. Reynolds1 and Jason W. Chapman2 1 Natural Resources Institutem University of Greenwich, Chatham, Kent, UK 2 Centre for Ecology and Conservation, and Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, UK

Chapter 8 Feeding behavior

Stephen J. Simpson1, Carlos Ribeiro2, and Daniel González-Tokman3 1 Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, NSW, Australia 2 Champalimaud Research, Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, Lisbon, Portugal 3 CONACYT, Red de Ecoetología, Instituto de Ecología, A. C. Xalapa, México

Chapter 9 Anti-predator behavior

Thomas N. Sherratt1 and Changku Kang1,2 1 Department of Biology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada, K1S 5B6 2 Department of Biosciences, Mokpo National University, Muan, Jeollanam-do, 58554, Republic of Korea

Chapter 10 Chemical communication

Bernard D. Roitberg, biology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada

Chapter 11 Visual communication

James C. O’Hanlon1, Thomas E. White2, and Kate D.L. Umbers3,4 1 School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale, Australia 2 School of Life and Environmental Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, 2006, Australia 3 School of Science and Health Western Sydney University, Hawkesbury, Richmond, NSW, Australia 4 Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, Western Sydney University, Hawkesbury, Richmond, NSW, Australia

Chapter 12 Acoustic communication

Heiner Römer, department of Zoology, University of Graz, Graz, Austria

Chapter 13 Reproductive behavior

Rachel Olzer, Rebecca L. Ehrlich, Justa L. Heinen-Kay, Jessie Tanner, and Marlene Zuk, department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, St Paul, Minnesota 55108, USA

Chapter 14 Parental care

Glauco Machado1 and Stephen T. Trumbo2 1 LAGE do Departamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, trav. 14, no 101, Cidade Universitária, 05508–090, São Paulo, SP, Brazil 2 Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut, Waterbury, CT 06702, USA

Chapter 15 Sociality

Jennifer Fewell1 and Patrick Abbot2 1 School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA 2 Department of Biological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA

Chapter 16 Personality and behavioral syndromes in insects and spiders

Carl N. Keiser, James L.L. Lichtenstein, Colin M. Wright, Gregory T. Chism, and Jonathan N. Pruitt, department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, USA

Chapter 17 Cognition and learning

Reuven Dukas, animal Behaviour Group, Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1, Canada

Chapter 18 The influence of parasites

Pedro F. Vale1, Jonathon A. Siva-Jothy1, André Morrill2, and Mark R. Forbes2 1 Institute of Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK 2 Department of Biology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada

Chapter 19 Behavioral, plastic, and evolutionary responses to a changing world

Wolf U. Blanckenhorn, evolutionary Biology & Environmental Studies, University of Zürich-Irchel, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich, Switzerland

Chapter 20 Behavior-based control of insect crop pests

Sandra A. Allan, center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology, ARS/ USDA, Gainesville, FL, USA

Chapter 21 Behavior-based control of arthropod vectors: the case of mosquitoes, ticks, and Chagasic bugs

Ana E. Gutiérrez-Cabrera1, Giovanni Benelli2, Thomas Walker3, José Antonio De Fuentes-Vicente4, and Alex Córdoba-Aguilar5 1 CONACyT-Centro de Investigación sobre Enfermedades Infecciosas, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública 62100, Cuernavaca, Morelos. México 2 Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Pisa, via del Borghetto 80, 56124 Pisa, Italy 3 Department of Disease Control, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom 4 Universidad Pablo Guardado Chávez, Libramiento Norte Oriente 3450, Fracc. Residencial Las Palmas, 29040, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas, México 5 Departamento de Ecología Evolutiva, Instituto de Ecología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70-275, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F., México

Chapter 22 Insect behavior in conservation

Tim R. New, department of Ecology, Environment and Evolution, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086, Australia

End Matter