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Negotiating TolerationDissent and the Hanoverian Succession, 1714-1760$
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Nigel Aston and Benjamin Bankurst

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780198804222

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198804222.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 07 December 2021

Changes in Dissenting Perceptions of the Hanoverian Succession, 1714 to c.1765

Changes in Dissenting Perceptions of the Hanoverian Succession, 1714 to c.1765

Chapter:
(p.53) 3 Changes in Dissenting Perceptions of the Hanoverian Succession, 1714 to c.1765
Source:
Negotiating Toleration
Author(s):

G. M. Ditchfield

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198804222.003.0004

The theme of this chapter is the enhancement of the legal, social, and political fortunes of English Dissent between the accession of George I in 1714 and the death of the Duke of Cumberland, the last of George II’s sons, in 1765. Dissenters had cause to fear that the House of Hanover might be overthrown by a Jacobite rebellion, and even after that possibility was effectually removed in 1746, they had not reinforced the security of their religious toleration by the achievement of civil equality. While grateful for the benefits conferred upon them by the Protestant succession, by the 1760s some Dissenters expressed dissatisfaction with the existing order and contemplated measures by which it could be reformed to accommodate their aspirations.

Keywords:   Dissent, Hanover, Jacobite, Protestant, toleration

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