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How Lives ChangePalanpur, India, and Development Economics$
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Himanshu, Peter Lanjouw, and Nicholas Stern

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198806509

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198806509.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 January 2022

Future Prospects

Future Prospects

Chapter:
(p.427) 12 Future Prospects*
Source:
How Lives Change
Author(s):

Himanshu

Peter Lanjouw

Nicholas Stern

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198806509.003.0013

This chapter attempts to draw on the analysis of seven decades of data and evidence from Palanpur to indicate some predictions for the future. It suggests that all-India trends of expanding non-farm, informal, employment will continue to exert an influence in Palanpur. The central role of caste and landholding in driving distributional outcomes is predicted to gradually diminish over time. However, a critical question relates to the potential role that the currently high, and rising, inequality might play in locking-in the forces that perpetuate inequality. The chapter argues that there is an intense need for improvement in the public supply of education and health services. Given the still weak state of education outcomes and also still poorly developed availability of financial services, it argues that for the foreseeable future entrepreneurship will continue to draw primarily on households’ own resources and initiative.

Keywords:   predictions, education, health, non-farm employment, inequality, entrepreneurship, caste

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