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Inequality and Inclusive Growth in Rich CountriesShared Challenges and Contrasting Fortunes$
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Brian Nolan

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198807032

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198807032.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 27 July 2021

How Has the Middle Fared in the Netherlands? A Tale of Stagnation and Population Shifts

How Has the Middle Fared in the Netherlands? A Tale of Stagnation and Population Shifts

Chapter:
(p.221) 9 How Has the Middle Fared in the Netherlands? A Tale of Stagnation and Population Shifts
Source:
Inequality and Inclusive Growth in Rich Countries
Author(s):

Wiemer Salverda

Stefan Thewissen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198807032.003.0009

This chapter sets out how inequality and real incomes across the distribution evolved in the Netherlands from the late 1970s through the economic Crisis. Inequality grew, though not dramatically, while wages showed remarkably little real increase. This meant that real income increases for households relied for the most part on the growth in female labour-force participation and in dual-income couples. The chapter highlights the major changes in population and household structures that underpinned the observed changes in household incomes at different points in the distribution. It also sets out key features of the institutional structures in the labour market and broader welfare state, and the centrality of the priority given to wage moderation and the maintenance of competitiveness in the growth model adopted throughout the period.

Keywords:   inequality, living standards, wage moderation, dual-earner couples, household composition, redistribution

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