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Effective Conservation ScienceData Not Dogma$
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Peter Kareiva, Michelle Marvier, and Brian Silliman

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198808978

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198808978.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 April 2021

Science communication is receiving a lot of attention, but there’s room to improve

Science communication is receiving a lot of attention, but there’s room to improve

Chapter:
(p.115) Chapter 18 Science communication is receiving a lot of attention, but there’s room to improve
Source:
Effective Conservation Science
Author(s):

Yuta J. Masuda

Tim Scharks

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198808978.003.0018

This chapter highlights communication failures in conservation. The environment is a secondary consideration to most of the American public, with the fraction of the US population that identifies itself as environmentalists shrinking year by year. This reflects the ineffectiveness of the conservation community at communicating why people should care about the environment, much less what they should do about it. This chapter outlines five failures in environmental and conservation communications. Three failures are well enough understood that they could and should be avoided. These failures are assuming the problem is simply an information deficit, misreading the audience’s values, and using fear to motivate. Two challenges remain that no one yet knows how to overcome: addressing psychological distance and overcoming compassion fade.

Keywords:   science communication, fear appeals, information deficit, compassion fade, psychological distance

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