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Prisons, Punishment, and the FamilyTowards a New Sociology of Punishment?$
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Rachel Condry and Peter Scharff Smith

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198810087

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198810087.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use.date: 27 January 2022

The Sociology of Punishment and the Effects of Imprisonment on Families

The Sociology of Punishment and the Effects of Imprisonment on Families

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 The Sociology of Punishment and the Effects of Imprisonment on Families
Source:
Prisons, Punishment, and the Family
Author(s):

Rachel Condry

Peter Scharff Smith

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198810087.003.0001

This chapter considers the impact of criminal justice and particularly prison upon the families of offenders and the ways in which they are drawn into the realm of punishment. It explores how imprisonment creates, reproduces, and reinforces patterns of social inequality. The chapter shows how prisoners’ families occupy an odd position of an increasing visibility in the academic realm. Much earlier work on prisoners’ families was concerned with identifying the difficulties they faced and how this might be addressed through policy measures. In more recent years, however, studies have begun to explore deeper theoretical, legal, and sociological questions which have important implications for criminology and criminal justice, the sociology of punishment, human rights, and the broader study of social justice.

Keywords:   sociology, punishment, imprisonment, prisoners’ families, social inequality, criminology, criminal justice, social justice, sociology of punishment, human rights

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