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Fulke Greville and the Culture of the English Renaissance$
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Russ Leo, Katrin Röder, and Freya Sierhuis

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198823445

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198823445.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 31 July 2021

Privation, Deprivation, and Unprivation in Fulke Greville’s Caelica

Privation, Deprivation, and Unprivation in Fulke Greville’s Caelica

Chapter:
(p.173) 10 Privation, Deprivation, and Unprivation in Fulke Greville’s Caelica
Source:
Fulke Greville and the Culture of the English Renaissance
Author(s):

Adrian Streete

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198823445.003.0010

Is sin something that exists materially? Or is it mere privation, a negative category that nonetheless moves the sinner away from the good? If so, then how does that movement occur, and to what end? If man is, as Fulke Greville often argues in his religious poetry, ‘a creature of vncreated sinne’, then how is it possible for something uncreated to have an operative effect? My argument is that Greville’s work is fully engaged with contemporary philosophical and grammatical debates on these questions. By examining his use of the terms ‘privation’, ‘deprivation’, and ‘unprivation’ in his sonnet cycle Caelica, we can see a sophisticated and intellectually daring response to the problem of ‘vncreated sinne’.

Keywords:   Caelica, religious poetry, sin, creation, matter, negation, evil

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